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Tuesday, October 16, 2012

London Fashion Week Banksy - Name without a face


Title: Space Girl and Bird

Medium: spray paint on steel
Year of Work: 2000
Size: 52 3/8 in x 21 1/4 in
Edition: Unique
Note: Part of a series of designs commissioned by Blur for the cover of their Think Tank album
Sale: Bonhams Vision 21 | London | April, 21 2007
Lot: 299





Title: Vandalised Phone Box

Medium: telephone box and pickax
Year of Work: 2005
Edition: Unique
Provenance: Work installed in Soho Square, London 2005 and later recovered from Westminster Environmental Services
Sale: Sotheby’s AUCTION (RED) | New York | February, 14 2008
Lot: 33A
Estimate: 200,000 – 300,000 USD





Title: The Rude Lord

Medium: oil on canvas in original artist’s frame

Year of Work: 2006

Size: 35 in x 30 1/4 in

Edition: Unique

Provenance: Lazarides Gallery, London

Exhibited: Barely Legal, 2006, Hunter Street Warehouse, Los Angeles

Sale: Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Evening Auction | London | October, 12 2007

Lot: 9

Estimate: 150,000 – 200,000 GBP








Title: The Rude Lord
Medium: oil on canvas in original artist’s frame
Year of Work: 2006
Size: 35 in x 30 1/4 in
Edition: Unique
Provenance: Lazarides Gallery, London
Exhibited: Barely Legal, 2006, Hunter Street Warehouse, Los Angeles
Sale: Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Evening Auction | London | October, 12 2007
Lot: 9
Estimate: 150,000 – 200,000 GBP
Sold For: 320,900 GBP (658,025 USD)




Title: Keep It Spotless (Defaced Hirst)
Description: Banksy (b. 1975) “Warning Sign” signed and dated 2007 on reverse
Medium: household gloss and spray paint on canvas
Year of Work: 2007
Size: 81 1/4 in x 120 1/8 in
Edition: Unique
Note: singed and dated 2007 on the reverse; Damien Hirst ‘Pharmaceutical” (spot) painting which Banksy defaced
Sale: Sotheby’s AUCTION (RED) | New York | February, 14 2008
Lot: 34
Estimate: 250,000 – 350,000 USD
Sold For: 1,870,000 USD


What is clear, since the bottoming of the art market in summer/fall 2009, there has been money pouring back into art, and certainly into the Banksy market as confidence has seemingly been restored in the global financial system. Whether it be genuine Banksy collectors swimming in Uncle Scrooge-like piles of cash. Or, more likely, investment bankers diversifying their portfolio with tangible assets or celebrities buying into several highly publicized projects covered by major media outlets (see Exit Through the Gift ShopBanksy vs. RobboOscar BuzzArt in the Streets), prices have risen at a staggering pace over the last 12 – 18 months. A more cynical view, which invariably arises when debating such lofty auction results, might suggest some level of price manipulation.
Yet, its probably far less devious. On the heels of the jaw-dropping success of his ironically timed Beautiful Inside My Head Forever two-day auction-style exhibition at Sotheby’s, which occurred on the exact same day Lehman Brothers failed and saw a record setting $199 million worth of artwork sold, Damien Hirst bluntly commented: “I guess it means people would rather put their money into butterflies than banks”. With a loss of faith in complex investment vehicles, perhaps its really that simple. People with monopoly money might just want to actually touch, or look at, their money, rather than have it esoterically exist in 1′s and 0′s for high-frequency traders or a single “fat finger trade” to jeopardize. It doesn’t matter what they’re buying or that they know nothing beyond the artist being “that street artist from that movie”.
http://arrestedmotion.com/2011/09/banksy-top-25-most-expensive-works-ever